‘How to Train Your Dragon: The Hidden World’ is a Worthy Ending to a Beloved Story

The third and final chapter of one of Dreamworks Animations most beloved franchises hit theaters this weekend, bringing in an impressive $55 million dollars at the Box Office, and asking viewers to go on one more enchanted adventure with our favorite Viking hero Hiccup and his loyal dragon Toothless.

The Hidden World follows Hiccup (Jay Baruchel), now the chief of Berk, who is struggling to embrace the responsibilities of leading his people and continuing to transform his island home into a utopia. Unfortunately, not everyone is ready to accept the idea of Vikings and Dragons coexisting peacefully. One of those opponents is Grimmel (F. Murray Abraham). Known as the Night Fury Killer, Grimmel is determined to complete his life’s work and eliminate the last surviving dragon of its kind, which just so happens to be Toothless. After a harrowing confrontation that leaves the majority of Berk a smouldering wreckage, Hiccup convinces the Vikings that the time has come to find a new home, one where they cannot be found and their dragons will be safe from those who wish them harm. Together with his mom Valka (Cate Blanchett) and his friends Astrid (America Ferrera), Fishlegs (Christopher Mintz-Plasse), Snoutlout (Jonah Hill), Ruffnut (Justin Rupple) and Tuffnut (Kristen Wiig), Hiccup sets out to find The Hidden World, the ancestral kingdom of all dragons, which lies in an unknown location at the edge of the earth. Along the way, they stumble upon a new breed of dragon: a female Light Fury, whom Toothless is immediately drawn to. But danger isn’t far behind, and with poison-spewing hybrid dragons ready to obey his every command, Grimmel will do whatever it takes to rip Hiccup apart from his best friend forever.

This latest instalment, based on Cressida Cowell’s best-selling series, promises viewers an uplifting, visually stunning conclusion to the film trilogy, of which it definitely delivers. The amount of detail, and the colour palettes incorporated into each character and in each new scene is remarkably well done. It is clear that a substantial amount of admiration and respect was poured into this production, only outweighed by the sheer happiness seen on the faces of both children and adults alike in the shadows of the theater.

This film reminds us all of the power of friendship, and how that rare, invaluable bond between a father and son, or even a boy and his dragon, can overcome anything, a message which heavily resonates in society today. The Hidden World casts a light on the importance of love and believing in yourself, demonstrating the impact just one person can have in paving the way to a better future for everyone.

Hiccup and Toothless, two lovable, quirky heroes bring forth the curious child in us all and their story, laden with nostalgia, comes to a beautiful, hopeful close at the hands of director Dean DeBlois, by adding some magic back into our mundane reality.

 

by Kacy Hogg

Kacy is an English Literature student living in the Great White North (no not Winterfell unfortunately), but Canada. She’s deeply in love with popcorn, French fries and chicken mcnuggets. When’s she’s not chugging back on tea, you can most likely find her at the cinema or tucked away in the corner of a bookstore. Her favorite films include the Harry Potter series, Cinderella, Captain America: The Winter Soldier, The Hangover, Casino Royale and Lady Bird. She’s also an avid binge-watcher of Game of Thrones and the Walking Dead. You can follow her on Twitter here: @KacHogg95

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