REVIEW- INSIDIOUS 4 THE LAST KEY: Supernatural sequel finds terror in domestic abuse, but fails to unlock its true demonic qualities
Reviews

REVIEW- INSIDIOUS 4 THE LAST KEY: Supernatural sequel finds terror in domestic abuse, but fails to unlock its true demonic qualities

The latest and (hopefully) final instalment of the Insidious franchise catches back up with psychic Elise Rainier (Lin Shaye) as she is plagued by nightmares of her childhood at the hands of her abusive father, during the time when she was first discovering her ‘gift’. Starting out with a set of very serious and violent … Continue reading

REVIEW- Requiem, Episode 1: BBC Supernatural thriller strikes perfect balance between bumps in the night and brutal realism
Reviews / TV / Women Film-makers

REVIEW- Requiem, Episode 1: BBC Supernatural thriller strikes perfect balance between bumps in the night and brutal realism

If there is one thing that TV is not short of, it’s ‘missing child mysteries’ and shows about suspicious rural towns; Dark, Stranger Things, Top of the Lake, The Returned, the list goes on. So what can BBC’s new supernatural thriller Requiem offer us on top of that? Judging by its gripping first episode, a … Continue reading

REVIEW- World of Tomorrow Episode 2: On abstract frames, the human subconscious and the politics of follow-ups
Reviews

REVIEW- World of Tomorrow Episode 2: On abstract frames, the human subconscious and the politics of follow-ups

On the surface, The Burden of Other People’s Thoughts is, like the sum of Don Hertzfeldt’s filmography, an agglomeration of sticks that coexist within copious abstract frames. In truth, the sequel to 2015’s World of Tomorrow (which, following its loss at the 88th Annual Academy Awards, incited a witch-hunt on affiliated voters) is yet another … Continue reading

REVIEW- Fill the Void: On admiration, gender roles and Hassidic traditions
Reviews

REVIEW- Fill the Void: On admiration, gender roles and Hassidic traditions

The term “coming of age film” generally conjures thoughts of teenage angst, parent-child arguments, and sexual exploration; arranged marriages and rabbinic counsels are typically absent on this list. However, Fill the Void adheres to the “coming of age” narrative while presenting an atypical setting: a Hassidic community in Tel Aviv, Israel. Rama Burshtein’s directorial debut … Continue reading